Example 1

Interesting example: what to save for the next roll?

Fig18

Here you can find an interesting example calculated by the program. How does the program change saved dice in the following case:

  • Current combination of dice = 1,1,2,2,3
  • Current combination of unused places = Ones & Fours & Sixes & Small Straight & Chances
  • Number of rolls left in the turn = 1
  • Yahtzee box already used with zero value (Y=0).

The program changes the combination of the saved dice depending on the score already earned in the Upper Section:

Upper Score missing from the minimum of 63 points

Dices to be saved for the next round from 11223

(0-not saved, 1-saved)

0

10101

1

10101

2

10101

3

10101

4

10101

5

10101

6

11101

7

10101

8

10101

9

10101

10

11101

11

10101

12

11101

13

10101

14

11101

15

10101

16

11101

17

10101

18

11101

19

10101

20

11101

21

10101

22

11101

23

11000

24

11101

25

10101

26

11101

27

11000

28

11101

29

11000

30

11101

31

10101

32

11101

33

11000

34

11101

35

10101

36

11101

37

11000

38

11101

39

11000

40

11101

41

10101

42

11101

43

11101

44

11101

45

10101

46

11101

47

10101

48

11101

49

10101

50

10101

51

10101

52

10101

53

10101

54

10101

55

10101

56

10101

57

10101

58

10101

59

10101

60

10101

61

10101

62

10101

63

10101

The combination of the saved dice is a result of an exact calculation. The program found that these comnibations for a given missing Upper Section score. This is wonderful example why Yahtzee is not a simple game!

Next

[Home] [Introduction] [Game description] [Mathematics] [1 dice, 1 roll, 1 box] [5 dice] [5 dice, 1 roll, 1 box] [5 dice, 3 rolls, 1 box I.] [5 dice, 3 rolls, 1 box II.] [Switch targets] [Upper bonus] [Extra bonus] [Best combination] [Best to save] [Example 1] [Example 2] [Download, links]